Moralizing sadists

“Moralizing sadism” is borrowed from Foucault. I have found it invariably to be true that, when reading the moralizing sermons of politicians, their intentions are sadistic; they know perfectly well that the recipients of their exhortations are not going to be improved (who is?), and at best the intended audience will be ashamed or at least saddened and hurt by hearing a sermon that points out their failures to measure up. Hence the sermonizer’s sadism.” – Barry Cooper

In the image above, a bouncer outside of a newly reopened sporting goods retailer near my home has just shouted at this father, saying:

“Sir, step back. I’m going to need you to read all of the signs. They’re there for a reason, you know.”

“I know the drill; we were here just yesterday.”

“Never mind. I need you to walk back so I can see you read the signs.” Continue reading “Moralizing sadists”

Keeping up

I love this insight from Etty Hillesum’s diary in which she reflects: “I must make sure I keep up with my writing, that is, with myself, or else things will start to go wrong for me: I shall run the risk of losing my way.”

There is so much there. Continue reading “Keeping up”

A new addition to the syllabus of noble lives

I don’t know much about Francis Collins, but since the Templeton Prize just announced that he’s the 2020 Laureate, I’m inspired to learn more.

Ever since learning about Sir John Templeton and the Prize, I became fascinated with the list of past laureates; I began to consider this list a syllabus for studying noble lives. Continue reading “A new addition to the syllabus of noble lives”