Humility is truth: Hildebrand on veracity

This evening I read Hildebrand’s brief chapter on veracity in The Art of Living.

Just this very day, a colleague of mine quoted the expression “Humility is truth” and we discussed it a bit. Hildebrand has an excellent description of its meaning:

The truthful person does not seek compensation for his inferiority complexes. The kinship that find its expression in the words ‘Humility is truth,’ may also be expressed conversed. The humble person alone is really truthful. The source of all ungenuineness and all untruthfulness is found in the proud desire to be something different from what we really are.

Veracity, like all important values, concerns not only the individual but human relationships. Thus, Hildebrand explains, “To lie is to misuse the quality entrusted to us as witnesses to being, in speech, in the spoken or written word. […] To deceive another person implies a fundamental disrespect, a failure to take him seriously.”

These are lucid and enlivening reflections to read, particularly as I attend a political networking conference.

“In comparison with the ‘heaven of heaven’ even the heaven of earth is still earth.” These words of St. Augustine echo in my soul. Seeing reality rightly and being spiritually free to have “deep reverence for the majesty of being.” This is what matters.

Jordan Peterson: “You must change what you are after more profoundly.”

Rule #4 in Jordan Peterson’s 12 Rules for Life: An Antidote to Chaos is: Compare yourself to who you were yesterday, not to who someone else is today.

He begins with a dozen or so examples to illustrate, “No matter how good you are at something, or how you rank your accomplishments, there is someone out there who makes you look incompetent.”  Continue reading “Jordan Peterson: “You must change what you are after more profoundly.””

On the anniversary the Virgin Mary Appeared to a Jewish Atheist who became a Catholic priest

Today marks the anniversary of the fascinating conversion of Alphonse Ratisbonne that occurred on Thursday, January 20, 1842. I have been learning his story gradually, throughout my travels to Rome and Jerusalem. Continue reading “On the anniversary the Virgin Mary Appeared to a Jewish Atheist who became a Catholic priest”

A Protestant and a Catholic discuss 465-year-old relic of St. Francis Xavier’s Arm

I arrived to Toronto to visit my Protestant friend for the week. She greeted me wishing me a happy new year and asking how I’d spent it.

“Well,” I explained, “At the conference from which I just came, we venerated a relic of St. Francis Xavier’s right arm, the arm with which he baptized 100,000 people.” Her first question was not “Why do Catholics venerate relics?” but rather “So, how did his arm come off?”

Continue reading “A Protestant and a Catholic discuss 465-year-old relic of St. Francis Xavier’s Arm”