What matters is that something is happening

Hans Jonas was born into a German Jewish household in 1903. As a boy, he longed for excitement. However, the most exciting events always seemed to be happening elsewhere. It seemed unlikely that he could fulfill his boyhood “dreams of glory” in the monotony of everyday life there.

Before the First World War, the most significant world events in his memory had been the sinking of the Titanic and the Balkan Wars. Comparing these events to his “charmed life — in a country that had known nothing but peace for decades, that was flourishing economically, and as a child in a comfortably situated family,” he found his life and the lives of his family members to be very boring. Continue reading “What matters is that something is happening”

Jordan Peterson and John Paul II on the responsibility of parents

The fifth rule in 12 Rules for Life: An Antidote to Chaos by is: “Do not let your children do anything that makes you dislike them.”

Throughout this chapter, Jordan Peterson discusses several anecdotes concerning parents and toddlers. “Children are damaged,” he explains, “when those charged with their care, afraid of any conflict or upset, no longer dare to correct them, and leave them without guidance. I can recognize such children on the street.” Continue reading “Jordan Peterson and John Paul II on the responsibility of parents”