Three Summer Opportunities

These are three phenomenal summer opportunities for which the deadlines to apply/register are quickly approaching.

I cannot emphasize how much Acton University and the Hildebrand Seminars, in particular, have been transformative to my personal development and have fundamentally given direction to my life, education, and work. I have also met some of my best and most enduring friends at these conferences and seminars. Getting involved with Acton and Hildebrand opens entire worlds. The cost is modest and the value is high. If you’d like any more information on any of these, please feel free to reach out to me. Continue reading “Three Summer Opportunities”

Book: The Personalism of John Paul II

One of my very favourite organizations, the Hildebrand Project, has just released this little book titled The Personalism of John Paul II.

I read it today and here’s the brief review I wrote of it on Amazon: Continue reading “Book: The Personalism of John Paul II”

World Book Day

Today is World Book Day, as designated by UNESCO. When John Paul II addressed the United Nations Educational, Scientific and Cultural Organization in 1980, he said:

Education consists in fact in enabling man to become more man, to “be” more and not just to “have” more and consequently, through everything he “has”, everything he “possesses”, to “be” man more fully. For this purpose man must be able to “be more” not only “with others”, but also “for others”. Education is of fundamental importance for the formation of inter-human and social relations.

Continue reading “World Book Day”

DNA is not what makes you you.

The results of the moral tests we face are more defining than the genetic tests we take. 

Recently, I was in Washington, D.C. No matter how often I visit the States, it always amazes me how obsessed Americans are with race. During a conference I attended, the other millennials spent their lunch hour going around the table sharing the breakdown of the ethnic percentages from their recently conducted home DNA tests. This struck me as a rather odd way of making introductions.

Click here to read the rest at HildebrandProject.org.

Hildebrand: La révérence

Aujourd’hui, j’ai commercé à lire un livre écrit par un de mes philosophes préférés qui s’appelle Dietrich von Hildebrand. Le livre republié par le Hildebrand Project s’intitule « The Art of Living. »

Il y a des chapitres courts et profonds au sujet de la révérence, la fidélité, la responsabilité, la véracité, la bonté, la communion et l’espoir. L’introduction est écrite par Peter Kreeft et deux chapitres sont écrits par la veuve de Dietrich qui s’appelle Alice.

J’ai lu le premier chapitre à propos de la révérence. Selon Hildebrand, la révérence est l’attitude par excellence de la vie morale parce que c’est l’ouverture aux valeurs qui rendent les êtres humains capables de répondre bien aux choses qui sont intrinsèquement importantes.

Ce que j’ai trouvé le plus intéressant est son explication de comment la révérence est la base de toute vraie communauté. Pour avoir du respect pour les autres, pour leur liberté et pour leurs droits, il est nécessaire d’avoir un sens de la valeur de leur individualité, préciosité et dignité qui nous donne les raisons fondamentales pour lesquelles ils sont dignes d’être respectés.

More than Consent: The Ennoblement of Sex

In Democracy in America Alexis de Tocqueville said, “Everybody feels the evil, but no one has courage or energy enough to seek the cure.” Today Patrick Brown resigned as Ontario PC Leader because of sexual misconduct allegations and federal MP Kent Hehr resigned from cabinet over allegations of sexual harassment. Continue reading “More than Consent: The Ennoblement of Sex”

No, art should not be unintelligible.

Last year, I participated in a winter school offered by Greek Studies on Site called Athens through the Ages. A couple days ago, I read Sohrab’s Ahmari’s book The New Philistines (Provocations): How Identity Politics Disfigures the Arts and this book took me right back to juxtaposed experiences at the Byzantine Museum and the Kolonaki Gallery in Athens. Continue reading “No, art should not be unintelligible.”