Culture and the Sacred

This evening, I’ve been reading some sections from Cardinal Sarah’s latest book The Day is Now Far Spent in which he addresses many contemporary issues. In a chapter on “Europe’s Crisis”, Cardinal Sarah discusses how a multicultural society can only flourish if there actually is a culture. And, as Josef Pieper explains so well inContinue reading “Culture and the Sacred”

Three Summer Opportunities

These are three phenomenal summer opportunities for which the deadlines to apply/register are quickly approaching. I cannot emphasize how much Acton University and the Hildebrand Seminars, in particular, have been transformative to my personal development and have fundamentally given direction to my life, education, and work. I have also met some of my best andContinue reading “Three Summer Opportunities”

Fortitude – Endurance in clinging to the good

Today I listened to a talk given by a friend on the virtue of fortitude. The subject of this talk reminded me of Sandro Botticelli’s depiction of Fortitude (1470), which is in the Uffizi in Florence. While it’s displayed in a set with six other paintings of virtues, this panel is the only one inContinue reading “Fortitude – Endurance in clinging to the good”

Our education in leisure

“We have come to accept compulsory military service in peacetime for the sake of national security. Am I too bold in suggesting the idea of compulsory adult education in leisure time for the sake of spiritual security?” — Rabbi Abraham Joshua Heschel How do you spend your leisure? I love this question.

The proper rites

“‘It would have been better to come back at the same hour,’ said the fox. ‘If, for example, you come at four o’clock in the afternoon, then at three o’clock I shall begin to be happy. I shall feel happier and happier as the hour advances. At four o’clock, I shall already be worrying andContinue reading “The proper rites”

An Antidote to Indifference

Many things come back to me in this season and today I recalled this excerpt from Josef Pieper’s memoir No One Could Have Known. In it, Pieper recalls, amidst his adventurous student days, making a thirty-day silent retreat. He says: What awaited me, as one of a group of fifteen to twenty companions was preciselyContinue reading “An Antidote to Indifference”

Reading: “I Want You to Be”

One of my favourite spiritual writers and the recipient of the 2014 Templeton Prize is Czech priest and philosopher Tomáš Halík. His previous books have such evocative titles as: Patience with God: The Story of Zacchaeus Continuing In Us and Night of the Confessor: Christian Faith in an Age of Uncertainty.