Always write your first name before your email signature, or else…

One of my absolute biggest pet peeves when it comes to email etiquette is when a person ends an email with some closing sign off immediately followed by a default signature block. 

This usually strikes me as both a bit terse and lazy. Continue reading “Always write your first name before your email signature, or else…”

Book: The Personalism of John Paul II

One of my very favourite organizations, the Hildebrand Project, has just released this little book titled The Personalism of John Paul II.

I read it today and here’s the brief review I wrote of it on Amazon: Continue reading “Book: The Personalism of John Paul II”

“Pick one shoe.”

A short reflection upon reading the preface of Tima Kurdi’s book The Boy on the Beach: My Family’s Escape from Syria and Our Hope for a New Home:

It’s so important and helpful to have these particular stories of individuals, sometimes with photos – memoirs written that are so descriptive and that completely endear a person to the personalities in the story and it really reminds me of how, when I was visiting Auschwitz, the survivors and the guides would say, ‘Okay, we’re going to go into this barrack and see the shoes. And you’re going to see thousands and thousands of shoes. But don’t look at all of them because it’s too immense. Instead, just pick one shoe and focus on it and think about the person whose feet filled that shoe, or that pair of shoes, because it’s the only way to begin to contemplate anything meaningful – not as an abstraction, but always personal.’ Continue reading ““Pick one shoe.””

“All real living is meeting”

In May I visited the Peres Center for Peace and Innovation in Tel Aviv. Our guide told us enthusiastically that Israel’s pioneers in high tech innovation were waiting to meet us in the next room. Automated doors opened and we were ushered into a maze of holograms. Each screen had a tech entrepreneur or innovator on the screen that was able to “answer your questions in a unique and advanced digital experience.” Continue reading ““All real living is meeting””

What man knows ten thousand faces?

This past weekend, one of my best friends suggested that now is a good time to think about Albert Camus’ book The Plague. Since I hadn’t read it before and given the 1947 novel was likely to be particularly resonant now, I spent the weekend reading it.

It’s remarkable how relatable the book is to the current pandemic. And so, I’ve woven some observations along with passages from Camus’ novel that I found most striking.

Fear and serious reflection began when people who society typically doesn’t consider “vulnerable” began to be infected.

“But other members of our community, not all menials or poor people, were to follow the path down which M. Michel had led the way. And it was then that fear, and with fear serious reflection, began.” Continue reading “What man knows ten thousand faces?”

DNA is not what makes you you.

The results of the moral tests we face are more defining than the genetic tests we take. 

Recently, I was in Washington, D.C. No matter how often I visit the States, it always amazes me how obsessed Americans are with race. During a conference I attended, the other millennials spent their lunch hour going around the table sharing the breakdown of the ethnic percentages from their recently conducted home DNA tests. This struck me as a rather odd way of making introductions.

Click here to read the rest at HildebrandProject.org.